Working in the Czech Republic (Práce v České republice)

Článek v ČEŠTINĚ dole (Klikněte na “Read the rest …”)

According to the Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs, about 260,000 foreigners are employed in the Czech Republic. More than one third of them work in the capital city, Prague. The statistics also include distribution according to each country. For example, 1,700 of the foreign workers come from the USA, 200 from Canada, and 160 from Australia that all either need or do not need a work permit. Foreigners are not the only ones seeking jobs outside of their home countries. Based on feedback that we have received and our own research, many young Czechs or Slovaks move abroad for studies or gaining professional expertise, and then they look for opportunities in their home countries. We have come across a portal that we will introduce to you that is a good source of information about new job postings but also employment statistics, employment offices, laws, and more.

Continue reading

Are Czechs Xenophobes? (Jsou Češi xenofobi?)

Článek v ČEŠTINĚ dole (Klikněte na “Read the rest …”)

Today we came across an article in the Prague Daily Monitor (PDM) named “Half of Czechs say there are too many foreigners in ČR. ” The title immediately caught our attention. Today, there are almost 2 million Czechs living abroad. The largest numbers of Czechs live in the USA, the country of people from around of world that has for hundreds of years accepted people from many countries. On the other hand, the Czech Republic is still mostly composed of Czechs (about 94%), followed by Slovaks, Poles, Germans, Ukrainians, Vietnamese, etc. The influx of immigrants for 2009 is estimated to be about 1 per 1000 people = 10,200 foreigners. During communism, there was a very minor foreign immigration to the Czech Republic. Did the recently growing numbers of immigrants create a resistance to other cultures?

Continue reading

Green Cards in the Czech Republic (Zelené Karty v České Republice)

Clanek v CESTINE dole.

On Friday, Sept 19th 2008, the Czech Senate approved a bill amendment that would make it easier to attract qualified staff from abroad to the Czech Republic. This movement is expected to bolster the Czech Republic’s supply of skilled workers from outside the European Union. If the amendment is signed by the president, the first green cards could be issued in January 2009. People’s reactions vary, though. Will this movement do any harm to the Czech nation?

Continue reading